The
Adirondack
Architecture
Guide

The first architectural guide to the entire Adirondack Park.

The Adirondack Architecture Guide enables readers to find buildings and sites, to learn something about them, and to understand them in the context of Adirondack history and culture. The Guide is being produced as three books covering the Southern-Central, Eastern, and Northern Regions. Read More

By Janet A. Null, in collaboration with Sagamore Institute of the Adirondacks

News & Updates

Now Available!

The Adirondack Architecture Guide, Southern-Central Region is available now through Amazon, Barnes and Noble, SUNY Press, and in bookstores this month. The e-book edition is available for Kindle and Google Play.

Read a new review at www.newyorkupstate.com

Upcoming Events:

August 12 — The Bookstore Plus, Lake Placid, NY
3-5 p.m. Meet the author & book signing

Completed Events:

August 8 - Hoss's Contry Corner, Long Lake, NY
7–9 p.m. Book signing at Author's Night

July 8 - Market Block Books, Troy, NY
11 a.m.–1p.m. Meet the author & book signing

July 8 - The Book House of Stuyvesant Plaza, Albany, NY
2–4 p.m. Meet the author & book signing

July 15 - Northshire Bookstore, Saratoga Springs, NY
6–8 p.m. Public presentation & book signing

July 21 - Adirondack Reader, Inlet, NY
10 a.m.–12 p.m. Meet the author & book signing

July 21 - Old Forge Hardware, Old Forge, NY
1–3 p.m. Meet the author & book signing

July 21 - View Arts Center, Old Forge, NY
7 p.m. Public presentation & discussion

Eastern & Northern Regions

Suggestions for sites to include in the Eastern Region and Northern Region books are still being accepted. Click on "Suggest a property" under Participate in the Guide.

Download a Tour

Download selected, unabridged Tours in the Southern-Central Region to enjoy immediately. Continue to monitor this space for periodic posting of new and different Tours to download.

Tour B-2: Long Lake 0.5 mb

On the scenic lake of the same name, this central Adirondack community that began with subsistence farming in the 1830s was a celebrated tourist destination by the late 1800s. Highlights on this tour include buildings by talented local builders, one of the few still operating historic Adirondack hotels, and a couple of Midcentury Modern gems.

Tour D: Rockwood to Speculator 2.0 mb

Tour a less-traveled route through the Southern Adirondacks, to see a cross-section of Adirondack architecture from historic school houses, to middle class camps, to former tanneries and hotels, to the oldest amusement park and the only surviving Civilian Conservation Corps camp.

Tour E-1: Northville 4.0 mb

More urban than other Southern-Central Adirondack communities, Northville became a thriving commercial center in the 1800s and early 1900s. Highlights include a still active Main Street with exemplary masonry buildings and a legacy of residential architecture reflecting the village’s historic affluence.

Download an Essay

Providing architectural-historical context for the Guide Tours, essays by invited authors discuss architects and designers, Adirondack building types, and cultural or geographic developments that shaped the settlement and architecture of the Adirondack Park. Monitor this space for new and different essays.

Rocks and Trees: Adirondack Building Materials 0.2 mb

Author: Janet A. Null

Historically, Adirondack designers and builders relied on native materials. Learn about the typical local materials and their use for both practical and aesthetic reasons—including the stone, logs, branches, and bark that were integral to the Adirondack Rustic Style.

Notable Links

Participate in the Guide

Join the experts on Adirondack culture and heritage, Town and County Historians, local residents, volunteer reviewers and others who are participating in developing an inclusive, accurate, and engaging guide to the diverse architecture of the Adirondack Park. Share your feedback, knowledge and suggestions by clicking the closest subject heading for your message.

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Support the Guide

Make a Tax Deductible contribution to Sagamore Institute of the Adirondacks (Great Camp Sagamore) to help support fieldwork and production costs of the Guide. Thank you for your support!sagamore_link_button